Mastering New Comfort Zones

Step out of your comfort zone. That’s what they tell you to do your whole life. And sometimes it’s easy. Making new friends. Trying new food. Trying new clothes or playing a new sport. Many things you do in your life involve an element of doing something different. But realizing that you are in another country on your own for three months…Let’s just say you think about your personal comfort zone much more deeply.

And you know, that’s why I took on this challenge of studying abroad. To see if it was something I could handle, a new “comfort” zone. But since being here, I have begun to wonder how different this new comfort zone is compared to the one at Fairfield University. Going to Fairfield, I was already forced out of my comfort zone. My home is located in the dangerous part of the south Bronx, where kids don’t go to school or work. Where boys like me don’t end up as seniors in college. Where opportunities are limited because of money. That was me; that was my comfort zone. Even though I pursued a better life for myself, I understood the people around me who didn’t. I understood there were certain things I couldn’t do or get because my family did not have money. Coming home from school, sometimes having a home cooked meal, but sometimes not eating because my mother was too tired from working two jobs. Then walking into Fairfield as a freshman and seeing a completely new world , I found myself out of my comfort zone pretty fast. Such as having to adjust to living on my own, being able to take advantage of any opportunity that I wanted. Seeing white people every day and understanding the effects of being a minority. Feeling uncomfortable in certain situations because you are so different from your peers. A lifestyle completely different from the one I grew up in for 18 years.

Now fast forward four years later and I have studied in Florence, Italy for almost 3 weeks now (wow). I’ve begun to realize that there is more to a comfort zone than just experiencing new people, places, and things. Because thinking about it now, I’ve already acclimated to the culture of Fairfield. All the things mentioned before that would be categorized as culture shock are a part of me now and I embrace them. And it is very similar here in Florence as well. Living on my own, seeing white people every day, being different from those around me, all things I am very used to. So when I decided to study abroad here, live here, and step out of my comfort zone again, exactly what would I be looking to step out of?

I think I touched on it this weekend. This weekend I traveled to the Island of Capri and visited the Amalfi Coast. I was beyond amazed. The pictures I took honestly don’t capture just how amazing this place is. “Who made all of this… and how” was what was going through my head every time I turned. A lot of it is really just incomprehensible. And I don’t think it’s supposed to be. Areas and scenery like the Amalfi Coast are just places to be admired. In the new mindset of embracing myself in this “new world” so to speak, I went around the coast just asking tour guides and people questions about its history, going into random stores and asking how long they have been there and why. I paid 20 euros and got on a boat with some friends and just went around the coast for an hour taking pictures, learning about the mountains, and the ancient legends.

 

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A selfie with the colorful houses of Amalfi.

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A beautiful view of the island of Amalfi from one of the mountains of Capri.

 

The Island of Capri was another amazing sight with amazing views. Taking a 20 minute walk uphill, I went to the museum to see old artifacts of the island and what it used to look like. I also decided to take a chairlift to view the island from high in the mountains while paying a few euros to listen to the history of its creation. I can honestly say that learning and understanding the places that I visited this weekend made it much more worthwhile.

 

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The view of the island of Capri from the chair lift.

2 Comments

Filed under Christopher in Italy, Western Europe

2 responses to “Mastering New Comfort Zones

  1. Jordan in Scotland

    You have such a wonderfully diverse perspective, coming from a poor black neighborhood to a white-majority university to an island in Italy. Thanks for sharing your inner thoughts. I’m interested to know what the differences in culture make you think about. Has stepping out of your comfort zone been a good thing?

    I hope it shows that things don’t have to be a certain way. I think people who are relegated to a single place simply don’t get the chance to realize that. It’s hard to demand more for ourselves when we don’t know what “more” is, or how to access it. Take the Brits, for instance: they don’t have Fritos! (Sorry, I’m sort of David Simon mixed with Joss Whedon.)

    • Christopher In Italy

      First off, thank you for your comments ! And to answer you question, I think it definitely has been a good thing. I’ve never liked being stagnant and staying in one situation or community for so long, if i can help. Granted growing up back home with no where else to really go, i couldnt change that environment on my own so i had to live with it. But going to college and being able to do practically anything i put my mind on, I think ive stepped far beyond my comfort zone in ways i could have never imagined, and it has definitely had a positive impact on my life so far.. and i still have 2 months to continue to grow.

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